Upcoming Nutrition Day School

The amazing Isy of ‘Another Dinner is Possible’ cookbook fame and lots of bad ass projects is teaching a Nutrition Day School with Feed Avalon this March:

When: Thursday 30th March 2017, 9.30am – 5pm

Where: Unit C1 Thriveability Hub, Northover Buildings, Glastonbury, BA6 9NU

What: Confused by nutrition information and ‘what’s good or bad for you’? This day school will explore the links between food, health and well-being, demystifying nutritional concepts and science, and emphasising a sustainable and pleasurable approach to feeding ourselves.

You’ll learn the nutritional science around healthy fats, vitamins and minerals, ‘superfoods’, fibre, blood sugar, food and mood, and more. We’ll discuss problems with our current food system, and think of ways to improve how and what we eat.

The emphasis is on plant-based nutrition, but not exclusively. The class will be a mixture of
presentations, activities, groupwork and discussion, handouts, plenty of breaks, and a potluck veggie lunch to share.

About the Tutor: Isy Schulz is a qualified nutritionist (BSc Human Nutrition) with a catering and community food organising background. Trained as a ‘Well Now’ health facilitator and co-author of the cookbook ‘Another Dinner is Possible’. Isy’s interests lie with sustainable food production, inventive plant-based whole food cookery, and improving our current food system.

Cost: The course costs £35 (there are some subsidised places).

To book: please email Nicole: eat@feedavalon.org.uk

Nutrition Day School

Health at Every Size Course

Feed Avalon are hosting this four-week course starting at the end of the month. I’m so stoked that my co-op are organising such a body-positive course <3

When: 29th March – 19th April 2017. Every Wednesday 10am – 12.30pm

Where: Unit C1, Thriveability Hub Northover Buildings, Glastonbury

What: Health at Every Size offers a new and compassionate approach to weight and well-being, shifting the focus away from the frustrating pursuit of weight loss in favour of self-care and developing long-term healthy habits.

Over 4 sessions, we will explore nutrition, and building a positive relationship with ourselves and with food, in a friendly and supportive group.

Classes will include discussion, presentations including nutrition and science, group work, a bit of homework and some fun activities too.

About the Tutor: Isy Schulz is a qualified nutritionist (BSc Human Nutrition) with a catering and community food organising background. Trained as a ‘Well Now’ health facilitator and co-author of the cookbook ‘Another Dinner is Possible’. Isy’s interests lie with sustainable food production, inventive plant-based whole food cookery, and improving our current food system.

Cost: The course costs £45, with some concessions available.

Advanced booking essential. To book please email Nicole: eat@feedavalon.org.uk

Health at Every Size Updated

 

Learn how to cook with Beans and Pulses

My co-op is hosting this course in November. Don’t miss!

When: Thursday 17th November 2016, 9.30 – 4.30pm

Where: Unit C1 Thriveability Hub, Northover Buildings, Glastonbury, BA6 9NU

How to book: please email eat@feedavalon.org.uk

A cheap and tasty source of protein, minerals, vitamin B1 and micronutrients, pulses make a great ally for both healthy eating and economic survival. 2016 has been the International Year of Pulses, in order to raise awareness about their advantages and encourage new uses along the whole food chain.

We will be sharing healthy vegan recipes with beans and pulses being the principle ingredient. We will cover cooking with pulses from soaking to cooking times, focusing on slow food cooking and preparation. The recipes will be of an international flavour yet combining organic, seasonal produce.

The class will include:

• Learning to make wholesome meals with beans and pulses
• Exploring different pulses and their principle uses and history
• Learning which pots to use and cooking times
• How to prepare delicious meals on a budget
• How to combine pulses with other ingredients for optimum taste
• Food and recipes to take home

Cost: The course is run on a sliding scale. Suggested A donation £10 to £50. There are some free places.

We work in partnership with Somerset Skills and Learning.

Beans and Pulses Web

Fantastic Fermentation Course this October

How to book: To book please email eat@feedavalon.org.uk

When: Saturday 22nd October 2016, 9.30 – 5pm

Where: Unit C1 Thriveability Hub, Northover Buildings, Glastonbury, BA6 9NU

What: In the course, you’ll be rediscovering the old methods of preserving food. We’ll be preparing, making and tasting fermented foods from all over the globe; a variety of sauerkrauts, kimchi, sourdough bread and more.

The course will be educational, from understanding the process to the nutritional values and health benefits. We’ll end the session with a chance to taste all the delicious food and have plenty to be taking home too.

Why: Fermented food tastes amazing and is a great way to consume probiotics from living food all year round – one of the many health benefits.

Cost: £35. There are a small number of free or subsidised places for people on low incomes. Max 14 places. Please book early.

This course has been supported by Somerset Skills and Learning.
Fermentation Course October

Introduction to Vegan Cooking Course – Saturday 1st October 2016

How to book: To book please email eat@feedavalon.org.uk

When: Saturday 1st October 2016, 09.30am – 4.30pm

Where: Unit C1 Thriveability Hub, Northover Buildings, Glastonbury, BA6 9NU

What: The workshop will be practical and hands on. We’ll learning simple cooking techniques, what foods to combine for nutritional value and interesting flavour combinations. They’ll also be a chance to discuss and learn the reasons to being and becoming a vegan.

Working with seasonal and organic ingredients we’ll make and prepare a meal, from starter, mains and a pudding. We’ll all get to share together the prepared meal in the end.

Why: There are many different reasons to become vegan or eat a plant based diet. They range from the food being healthier for you, the environmental impact, to a plant based diet being lower in cost. Yet the best thing is tasty wholesome dishes and meals.

Cost: The course is FREE however donations are very welcome.

Vegan Cooking October 2016

 

Free Fermentation Workshop this June

How to book: To book please email eat@feedavalon.org.uk

When: Thursday 16th June 2016, 10am – 3pm

Where: Unit C1 Thriveability Hub, Northover Buildings, Glastonbury, BA6 9NU

What: In the workshop you’ll be rediscovering the old methods of preserving food. We’ll be preparing, making and tasting fermented foods from all over the globe; a variety of sauerkrauts, kimchi, sourdough bread and more.

The workshop will be educational, from understanding the process to the nutritional values and health benefits. We’ll end the session with a chance to taste all the delicious food and have plenty to be taking home too.

Why: Fermented food tastes amazing and is a great way to consume probiotics from living food all year round – one of the many health benefits.

Cost: The course is FREE however donations are very welcome.

This course has been supported by Somerset Skills and Learning.
Fermentation Workshop June

Introduction to Vegan Cooking Course – Thursday 2nd June

How to book: To book please email eat@feedavalon.org.uk

When: Thursday 2nd June 2016, 10am – 3pm

Where: Unit C1 Thriveability Hub, Northover Buildings, Glastonbury, BA6 9NU

What: The workshop will be practical and hands on. We’ll learning simple cooking techniques, what foods to combine for nutritional value and interesting flavour combinations. They’ll also be a chance to discuss and learn the reasons to being and becoming a vegan.

Working with seasonal and organic ingredients we’ll make and prepare a meal, from starter, mains and a pudding. We’ll all get to share together the prepared meal in the end.

Why: There are many different reasons to become vegan or eat a plant based diet. They range from the food being healthier for you, the environmental impact, to a plant based diet being lower in cost. Yet the best thing is tasty wholesome dishes and meals.

Cost: The course is FREE however donations are very welcome.

Vegan Cooking June

 

Workshop Handout: Vegetable & Fruit Bottling

Written by Karin Shaw of Dragon Willows Farm: http://www.dragonwillowsfarm.co.uk/

For more courses organised by Feed Avalon visit: http://www.feedavalon.org.uk/projects/eat-project/

DSCF3423Most fruits and vegetables are able to be preserved by bottling.

Bottling is simply a way of sterilising the fruit or vegetable and sealing out air and thereby preventing bacteria making the produce deteriorate and go bad.

Traditionally ‘Kilner’ type jars comprising of a heat-proof glass jar, rubber seal, glass lid and metal screw on seal were used for bottling.  However these are expensive to buy and unless you already have some of these jars, it is much more economical to use largish jam and/or pickle jars and really environmentally friendly to recycle and reuse these type of jars.  Most of us will have access to used jars.

The priority in all cases is to ensure that the jars are very, very clean before use.  To achieve this wash them in very hot water and washing up liquid and then dry up-side-down on a backing tray in a warm oven (100°C) for around 20 minutes.  Then keep them upside down while they cool before use.  Alternatively, they can be run through the hot wash cycle on a dishwasher.

Apart from the jars you will need lids – they will not take oven drying as the plastic sealant inside most lids will melt.  Lids can be sterilised by immersing in a bowl of boiling water for a few minutes before using to seal the jars.

Also required for bottling is a large pan if you are planning to sterilise using the top of a cooker, or a roasting tin if you are going to use the oven.  In either case you will also need something to place on the bottom of the pan/tin to prevent direct heat on the base of the jars, for example a wad of folded newspaper, some cloth, a folded tea-towel etc., or you may have a roasting tin or fish kettle which has a wire trivet in the bottom already.

You will also need a thermometer to check the temperature of the contents of the jars to ensure that the required sterilisation temperature has been reached.
A kitchen thermometer is worth the investment and does not need to be very expensive.

Method:

Small fruits and vegetables such as berries, peas, shelled beans, etc., can be bottled whole.  Ensure the produce is clean and any stalks etc., have been removed.  Large and or hard produce should be shelled/peeled where applicable and cut into junks that will fit easily into the jars.  For example apples should be cored and cut into quarters. Carrots can be diced or sliced, runner beans should be de-strung and cut into chunky slices.

Fruits/vegetables that can be bottled whole but have skins, i.e., plums, tomatoes, gooseberries, need to have their skins pricked with a skewer before packing into the jars to ensure they do not burst open during sterilisation

Pack the fruits/vegetables into the jars (give them a little shake to ensure that the produce settles in the jar to get maximum fill.)  For items like plums and tomatoes or chunkier vegetables it is sometimes helpful to use a long skewer or knitting needle to get them placed in the bottom of the jar.

Once packed fill the jars to within 1cm of the top with cold water.  Place the full jars into the pan or roasting tin having first placed either folded cloth/newspaper etc., as described above into the bottom to stand the jars on.

Ensure that the jars do not touch the sides of the pan/tin or each other or there is a chance they will crack during heating.

Then fill the pan/tin with cold water to come half way up the jars in the case of the pan, and sufficient without over-filling in case of the tin.

Then heat up starting on low heat either on top or in the oven and slowing increasing the heat until sterilisation temperature (see below) is reached. Use the kitchen thermometer to check the temperature by inserting it into the centre of the contents in each jar.

Once sterilisation is complete (see timings below) remove pan/tin from heat and remove the jars (use oven cloves or cloth as jars will be hot) and place them on a flat surface on either a folded cloth or newspaper – DO NOT PLACE THE HOT JARS ON A COLD SURFACE AS THEY WILL CRACK.

Then seal them with the relevant lids.  Place the jars in a cool, dark place to store.  Check them ever so often.  Any signs of fermentation (bubbles rising in the jar) can be stopped by emptying the jar into a pan and boiling the produce. It will however need to be used within a couple of days.

Other liquids can be used with the produce in the jars.  Salt can be added to vegetables (approximately 1 teaspoon of salt to 1 pint of water).  And a sugar syrup can be used for fruits (340 gms of sugar to 2 pints of water) – boil them together to make a syrup and then pour over the fruit in the jars.

The advantage of using plain water is that it is very economical and the produce can be flavoured with anything when it is used later – i.e., for soups, fruit puddings, pies etc.

Sterilisation Temperatures and Times:

Soft fruits and berries (raspberries, blackberries, strawberries etc.,) must be allowed to take 1½ hours to reach a temperature of 75°C and kept at that heat for 10 to 15 minutes.

Hard fruits and vegetables such as plums, apples, pears, beans, peas, carrots etc., should be allowed 1½ hours to reach 75°C and kept at that heat for 15 minutes.

Some of the harder vegetables will not necessarily be ‘cooked’ soft during sterilisation and cooking can be completed when the vegetable is eventually going to be eaten.

Soft fruits will almost certainly shrink in the jars during sterilisation and the jars should be topped up from one of the other jars being sterilised.  This may result in a jar less than full at the end of the process and the contents of this jar should be used as soon as possible.

Avalon Abundance Course – practical workshops in harvesting, storing and preserving food

Avalon Abundance

HarvestsLearn:

• How to make jams & jellies
• Super simple soup making
• Low impact food storage including clamping, cellars & cool storage
• How to make chutney
• How to store beans of all varieties
• How to dehydrate produce
• Bottling & canning
• How to freeze & chill produce safely • How to make juices
• Techniques of fermentation

Workshops can be taken individually or as part of a longer course.

Workshop spaces will be on a first-come-first served basis. Individuals doing the longer course will be prioritised.

All workshops will take place at kitchens in Glastonbury & Street and be led by experienced tutors. Total beginners welcome!

Workshops are free for individuals on benefits or a low income. Suggested donation of £10 per workshop for those paying, or £65 for the whole course.

Dates, times & locations available on request. Interested? Register by emailing: nicole@feedavalon.org.uk

This course has been funded by Somerset Skills and Learning.